Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Birth Date*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.
Please agree to all the terms and conditions before proceeding to the next step

Already a member?

Login
+86 150-8901-2527 Info@TourTtraavelTibet.com

Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Birth Date*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.
Please agree to all the terms and conditions before proceeding to the next step

Already a member?

Login

Discover Lhasa Chengguan District: The Sacred Heart of Tibet

Lhasa, often translated as “the place of the gods” in the Tibetan language, is not just any city. It’s a city steeped in over 1300 years of history, serving as the political, economic, cultural, and religious hub of Tibet. Located at the coordinates of 29.6°N latitude and 91.1°E longitude, Lhasa sits on the northern banks of the Lhasa River, a tributary of the Yarlung Tsangpo River, nestled in the central-southern part of Tibet.

The Name Lhasa: A History of Sanctity

The name “Lhasa” carries with it a profound meaning, signifying “holy land” or “Buddha land” in Tibetan. Historical texts have recorded it by various translations, including “Ra-sa” and “La-sa” among others. The city’s origin traces back to the 7th century when Songtsän Gampo, the founder of the Tibetan Empire, moved the capital to this sacred land, uniting various tribes under his rule.

Legend has it that when Princess Wencheng of the Tang dynasty arrived in Tibet, Lhasa was merely a barren landscape. Soon after, the construction of the Jokhang and Ramoche Temples began, laying the foundation for what would become the city’s old quarter. Songtsän Gampo further expanded his influence by building the iconic Potala Palace on Red Hill and other palaces in the Lhasa valley, marking the beginning of Lhasa’s prominence as a distinguished city on the high plateau.

Administrative Divisions and Demographics

Chengguan District, nestled along the central stretch of the Lhasa River, a gradual ascent from the river’s banks to its northern and southern boundaries. The district extends approximately 28 kilometers east to west and about 31 kilometers north to south. It shares its western border with Doilungdêqên District, Dagzê County to the east, and Lhünzhub County to the north.

Positioned at an altitude of 3,650 meters, Chengguan District occupies a total area of 525 square kilometers. Of this, the urban area constitutes 60 square kilometers, marking the region’s developed core. The city government is located on Jiangsu Avenue in the Chengguan district. As of the end of 2022, Lhasa’s registered population was approximately 581,200, with a permanent resident count of nearly 867,891 as of November 1, 2020.

NameTibetanChinesePinyin
Barkhor Subdistrictབར་སྒོར་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།八廓街道Bākuò Jiēdào
Gyirai Subdistrictསྐྱིད་རས་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།吉日街道Jírì Jiēdào
Jêbumgang Subdistrictརྗེ་འབུམ་སྒང་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།吉崩岗街道Jíbēnggǎng Jiēdào
Chabxi Subdistrictགྲ་བཞི་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།扎细街道Zāxì Jiēdào
Gündêling Subdistrictཀུན་བདེ་གླིང་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།公德林街道Gōngdélín Jiēdào
Garmagoinsar Subdistrictཀརྨ་མ་ཀུན་བཟང་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།嘎玛贡桑街道Gámǎgòngsāng Jiēdào
Liangdao Subdistrictགླིང་ཕྲན་གཉིས་ཀྱི་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།两岛街道Liǎngdǎo Jiēdào
Jinzhu West Road Subdistrictབཅིངས་འགྲོལ་ནུབ་ལམ་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།金珠西路街道Jīnzhū Xīlù Jiēdào
Ngaqên Subdistrictསྣ་ཆེན་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།纳金街道Nàjīn Jiēdào
Togdê Subdistrictདོག་སྡེ་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།夺底街道Duóde Jiēdào
Caigungtang Subdistrictཚལ་གུང་ཐང་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།蔡公堂街道Càigōngtáng Jiēdào
Nyangrain Subdistrictཉང་བྲན་ཁྲོམ་གཞུང་།娘热街道Niángrè Jiēdào

Geography and Climate: A City Above the Clouds

Lhasa’s terrain slopes from east to west, featuring a strip-like distribution. With an elevation of 3,650 meters, it stands as one of the highest cities in the world. The central and southern parts consist of the middle reaches of the Lhasa River Valley, boasting flat landscapes.

The climate in Lhasa is characterized by a temperate, semi-arid plateau monsoon climate, offering more than 3,000 hours of sunshine annually and earning it the nickname “the Sunlight City.” Rainfall ranges from 200 to 510 millimeters, mainly occurring between June and September, often in the form of nighttime showers. Temperatures can vary greatly, with highs reaching up to 29°C and lows dipping to -14°C. The thin air and significant temperature differences create a unique weather pattern, with dry and windy conditions prevalent in the winter and spring, and a frost-free period lasting 100 to 120 days each year.

Lhasa: A Modern City Rich in Traditional Tibetan Products


Today, Lhasa has transformed into a burgeoning modern city, boasting a range of industries from electricity and mining to construction materials, printing, textiles, machinery repair, food processing, and handicrafts. With over 10,000 commercial outlets, Lhasa offers a rich variety of goods, complemented by advanced communication facilities. The city is well-equipped in terms of scientific research, education, healthcare, cultural and sports facilities, and financial services, making it a comprehensive urban center.

Celebrated Traditional Tibetan Products

Among the most famous traditional products of Lhasa are souvenirs, artistic items, and Tibetan medicine, highly sought after on the international market. These include ritual objects, Thangkas, carpets, mats, aprons, wooden bowls, traditional knives, and gold and silver jewelry. These items not only reflect the rich cultural heritage of Tibet but are also in high demand globally for their unique craftsmanship and cultural significance.

Tibetan Medicine: A National Intangible Cultural Heritage

In 2006, the traditional methods of mercury purification and the compounding techniques of Tibetan medicine, particularly those involving the Rinchen Trangjor formula, were inscribed on the National Intangible Cultural Heritage list. These practices represent the essence of Tibetan medicinal preparation, encapsulating the entire spectrum of traditional processing techniques. They reflect the unique Tibetan approaches to cognition, diagnosis, and pharmacology.

Travel Tips for Lhasa Visitors

For those looking to purchase souvenirs in Lhasa, Barkhor Street is the prime destination. Tourists interested in ritual objects can also visit the nearby Jokhang Temple to have their items blessed by Lamas. While artistic items are abundant throughout Lhasa, it’s worth noting that prices within tourist spots tend to be higher. For Tibetan medicine, the best place to shop is the pharmacy department of the Tibetan hospital located diagonally opposite to the Jokhang Temple Square.

In summary, Lhasa merges its rich cultural traditions with modern advancements, offering a unique blend of the past and present. Its traditional products and Tibetan medicine not only serve as a testament to its rich heritage but also play a vital role in its economy and cultural preservation.

Exploring Lhasa: A Guide to Travel and Transportation


Lhasa, the heart of Tibet, is accessible through air, road, and rail, making it the primary gateway for travelers venturing into this mystical land. Traditionally, most visitors preferred flying to Lhasa from major cities like Chengdu, Xi’an, Chongqing, and Shangri-La, enjoying the convenience, safety, and time-saving aspects of air travel.

However, since July 2006, an additional travel option has become popular: the scenic train journey to Tibet. Direct train services from Beijing, Chengdu, Chongqing, Xining, Lanzhou, Shanghai, and Guangzhou to Lhasa offer travelers stunning views along the way. The most challenging yet visually rewarding route is by road, with five main highways leading into Tibet: the Qinghai-Tibet, Sichuan-Tibet, Yunnan-Tibet, Xinjiang-Tibet, and China-Nepal highways.

Air Travel: Gateway to Lhasa

Lhasa Gonggar Airport, located in Gonggar County, Shannan, about 85 kilometers from Lhasa and at an elevation of 3569.5 meters, is the main airport serving Tibet and a hub for China International Airlines. As of the summer and fall of 2023, it could handle up to 180 flights per day, including new routes to Xichang, Qianjiang, Huai’an, Lianyungang, and Dingri. Chengdu, Mianyang, and Xi’an are among the cities with the highest daily flight volumes to Lhasa.

Over ten airlines operate in Tibet, offering more than 50 routes, including one international route, connecting over 30 cities. This network centers around Lhasa, with important nodes in Changdu and Linzhi, making Chengdu and Chongqing key entry points to Tibet.

Travel Tips Flights travel:

  • Late August sees a peak in travel due to Tibetan students heading to the mainland for school, particularly around the Shoton Festival, making flight tickets out of Tibet scarce. Remember to book your tickets in advance!
  • The tourist high season from June to September sees a surge in travelers and potentially additional flights, so it’s wise to confirm your flight details before departure.

Road Travel: A Closer Look at Tibetan Life

Traveling by long-distance bus offers an intimate glimpse into the lives of the local Tibetan population. A comprehensive road network centers around Lhasa, extending throughout the region with five national highways, 15 main roads, and over 300 secondary roads.

  1. Qinghai-Tibet Highway: This highway, part of National Highway 109 from Xining, Qinghai to Lhasa, Tibet, stretches 1,999 kilometers and is the world’s highest and longest asphalt road. It’s also the safest and most reliable route into Tibet, carrying over 80% of goods into the region. Travelers on this road witness diverse landscapes, including grasslands, salt lakes, deserts, and mountains.
  2. Sichuan-Tibet Highway: Starting in Chengdu, Sichuan, and ending in Lhasa, Tibet, this highway is part of National Highway 318 and is known as “China’s most beautiful scenic route.” The road splits into northern and southern routes at Xinduqiao, with the southern route known for its breathtaking scenery despite its more challenging conditions, including landslides and mountainous terrain.

Navigating Through Tibet: The Roads Less Traveled


Yunnan-Tibet Highway: A Scenic Route Through Diverse Cultures

The Yunnan-Tibet Highway, completed in 1974 and stretching 1625 kilometers, connects the southern end of the Sichuan-Tibet Highway to the Kunming-Bangkok Highway. This route, once a part of the ancient Tea Horse Road, is known for its relatively low altitude compared to other national highways in the region. It passes through the Zhongdian Plateau and the Hengduan Mountains, offering travelers breathtaking high mountain and deep valley views. Despite the challenging road conditions, its mild climate, beautiful landscapes, and the blend of multiple ethnic cultures with the breathtaking scenery of northwestern Yunnan make it a colorful journey. However, travelers should be cautious of landslides and mudslides during the rainy season.

Xinjiang-Tibet Highway: The Highest Road in the World

The Xinjiang-Tibet Highway, also known as the G219, spans 2841 kilometers from Yecheng in Xinjiang to Lhatse in Tibet, extending further to Purang. Crossing over mountain passes like the Jieshan Daban at 6700 meters and the Kudengnibu at 5432 meters, this route features vast Gobi deserts and perennial snow-capped mountains, making it the highest highway in the world. The best time to travel this road is between July and August when the landscape reveals the stunning beauty of the Karakoram and Kunlun Mountains, high-altitude lakes, and diverse wildlife.

China-Nepal Highway: A Link Between Cultures

The China-Nepal Highway, stretching over 900 kilometers from Kathmandu, Nepal, through the Friendship Bridge at Zhangmu into Tibet, and then to Lhasa, offers travelers relatively good road conditions and scenic views. This route is particularly popular among foreign tourists traveling between Tibet and Nepal, providing views of the majestic Himalayas along the way and the chance to explore Tibet’s second-largest city, Shigatse, before reaching Lhasa.

Road Travel Tips:

  • In recent years, self-driving tours into Tibet have become increasingly popular. These journeys require thorough preparation for various emergencies, testing the traveler’s wisdom and will but rewarding them with immense joy and rich experiences. Chains are essential for winter travel.
  • Over the past two decades, from 1994 to 2022, transportation in and out of Tibet has greatly improved, making the once daunting journey into Tibet a thing of the past and significantly easing travel difficulties.

The Qinghai-Tibet Railway: An Eco-Friendly Journey to the Roof of the World


The Qinghai-Tibet Railway, extending 1963 kilometers from Xining to Lhasa (with segments from Xining to Golmud and Golmud to Lhasa), began trial operations on July 1, 2006, and officially started on July 1, 2007. Crossing natural reserves like the Hoh Xil, Sanjiangyuan, and Qiangtang, this railway is celebrated as China’s first “environment-friendly railway,” providing a safe, fast, and comfortable journey over 4000 meters above sea level for 965 kilometers.

Additionally, the Sichuan-Tibet Railway, totaling 1838 kilometers, includes segments from Chengdu to Kangding (opened in December 2018), Kangding to Linzhi (under construction), and Lhasa to Linzhi (opened in June 2021). The Lhasa to Shigatse Railway, which began operations in August 2014, stretches 253 kilometers, taking passengers through stunning gorges and the vibrant landscapes of Tibet’s southwest.

Travel Tips:

  • The Golmud to Lhasa segment of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway features 45 stations, including 9 scenic viewing stations, with 8 manned stations for boarding. While enjoying the breathtaking views from the viewing platforms, travelers are advised to refrain from sudden movements to ensure safety.

Lhasa’s Golden Travel Routes: Exploring Tibet’s Heart


Lhasa has unveiled six major travel routes, collectively known as the “Golden Travel Routes.” These routes encompass all the major attractions and opened areas within Tibet, offering travelers a comprehensive glimpse into the region’s breathtaking landscapes, rich culture, and unique traditions.

The Heartland of Tibet Tour

This circular journey, also referred to as the “Golden Triangle Tour,” spans approximately 1000 kilometers, starting and ending in Lhasa. It covers counties like Qushui, Gonggar, Zhanang, Sangri, Zêtang, Gacha, Lang County, Milin, Nyingchi, Gongbo’gyamda, Mêdog, and Dagzê. This route showcases the stunning natural beauty of Tibet and the traditional lifestyles of the Monpa and Lhoba peoples, offering a deep dive into Tibet’s diverse cultural tapestry.

Lhasa to Nagqu Route

Spanning 326 kilometers, this route can take between 4 to 6 hours by car, passing through Doilungdêqên and Damxung counties. The journey reveals Tibet’s pastoral beauty, with lush grasslands and herds of yaks and sheep dotting the landscape, presenting a serene and picturesque experience.

Lhasa to Shigatse Route

Travelers can choose between the southern route, covering 340 kilometers via Gampa La Pass, Yamdrok Lake, Lhoka, and Gyantse County, or the northern route, a shorter 228 kilometers via Nyemo and Rinbung counties. Shigatse, known for its rich history, developed culture, and strategic location, is one of Tibet’s most attractive destinations.

Lhasa to Nyingchi Route

This 406-kilometer journey takes travelers through Dagzê and Mêdog counties, offering views of the Yarlung Tsangpo Grand Canyon and the recently accessible Mêdog County. The route is famed for its stunning natural landscapes, unique cultural sites, and the mystique of its numerous deity worships.

Lhasa to Shannan Route

A 160-kilometer trip along the Yarlung Tsangpo River through Zhanang and Gonggar counties leads to Shannan, the cradle of Tibetan farming civilization. This area boasts significant historical sites, including Tibet’s first agricultural fields, king, palace, monastery, and the origins of Tibetan opera, enriching the cultural depth of any visit.

Lhasa to Ngari Route

Starting from Lhasa, this route heads to Shigatse, then Lhatse, and diverges into two paths towards Ngari: the northern route (1760 kilometers) through Coqên, Gar, and Ge’gyai to Shiquanhe, offers high altitudes with fewer attractions but possible sightings of Tibetan antelope and wild donkeys; the southern route (1190 kilometers) leads to the sacred Lake Manasarovar and the revered Mount Kailash through Saga and Zhongba, continuing south to Purang and then to Zanda, reaching Shiquanhe. Ngari, known as the “roof of the world’s roof,” is a spiritual hub for ancient Bon traditions and a popular pilgrimage destination.

Travel Tips:

The best time to visit Lhasa and its surroundings is during the summer and autumn when the weather is warm and moist, with scenic beauty at its peak. The conventional travel season, marked by nightly rains that refresh the landscape and a pleasant climate in July and August, starts around the May Day holiday, signaling the beginning of an ideal period for exploration.

Each route offers a unique perspective on Tibet’s vast landscapes, historical depth, and cultural richness, providing unforgettable experiences for every traveler venturing into the heart of this ancient land.

Discover the Majestic Potala Palace: A Unique Jewel of Tibet Crown

Visiting Potala Palace is more than just a journey through a historic site; it's an...
Read More

Exploring Drapchi Monastery: A Popular Serene Sanctuary for Wealth Goddess

Drapchi Monastery serves as a gateway to the spiritual and cultural richness of Tibet. It...
Read More

Discover Nechung Monastery: Most Important Spiritual Protectorate of Nation

Explore the serene Nechung Monastery, nestled in Lhasa's western suburbs, just a kilometer away from...
Read More

Discover Sera Monastery: A unique Blossoming Sanctuary of Tibetan Buddhism

Venture just 5km north of Lhasa to discover Sera Monastery, a serene sanctuary at the...
Read More

Discovering Drepung Monastery: A Popular Jewel in Lhasa’s Crown

Drepung Monastery is more than just a monument; it's a living testament to Tibet's rich...
Read More

Discover Ramoche Temple: A Unique Spiritual Hub in Lhasa

Ramoche Temple, or the Upper Tantric College, stands proudly in Lhasa, Tibet, as a significant...
Read More

Jokhang Temple: The Heart of Lhasa’s Spiritual Landscape

Explore Jokhang Temple, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a pinnacle of Tibetan Buddhism in...
Read More

Lukhang Park: A Popular Serene Oasis Behind the Potala Palace

Discover the enchanting Lukhang Park (Zongjiao Lukang), a serene oasis located behind Potala Palace in...
Read More

Lhalu Wetland Nature Reserve: The Heart of Lhasa

Discover the serene beauty of Lhalu Wetland Nature Reserve in Lhasa, Tibet's largest urban wetland....
Read More

The Lhasa River: A Popular River of Joy and Prosperity

Discover the enchanting beauty and cultural significance of the Lhasa River, Tibet's highest urban wetland....
Read More

Discovering the Treasures of Tibet: A Unique Journey Through the Tibet Museum

The Tibet Museum serves as a window into the heart of Tibetan culture and history,...
Read More

The Hidden Stories Behind Lhasa’s Street Names

Lhasa’s streets are more than just pathways; they are a mosaic of history, culture, and...
Read More

Exploring the Popular Lhasa Mosque: A Journey Through Its Islamic in Tibet

Dive into the heart of Lhasa, Tibet, and discover the unique blend of Islamic and...
Read More

Explore Meru Nyingpa Temple in Lhasa: A Tibetan Buddhist Sanctuary

Discover the rich history and spiritual essence of Meru Nyingpa Temple, located in the heart...
Read More

Nechung Temple: A Tibetan Buddhist Treasure

Explore the spiritual and cultural wonder of Nechung Temple in Lhasa. Uncover the history, architecture,...
Read More
About the author

The Tibetan Travel website's creator, hailing from Lhasa, is a cultural enthusiast. They promote responsible tourism, connecting the world to Tibet's beauty and heritage. Awards recognize their contribution.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Proceed Booking