Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Birth Date*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.
Please agree to all the terms and conditions before proceeding to the next step

Already a member?

Login
+86 150-8901-2527 Info@TourTtraavelTibet.com

Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Birth Date*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.
Please agree to all the terms and conditions before proceeding to the next step

Already a member?

Login

Princess Jincheng: A Cultural Bridge in Tibetan History

Princess Jincheng, known by her birth name Li Nunu, was a revered figure of the Tang Dynasty, famed for her marriage to Tibetan King Tride Tsukten. Adopted by Emperor Zhongzong of Tang, she contributed significantly to the Sino-Tibetan relations, reinforcing the alliance initiated by Princess Wencheng.

Background of the Princess’s Marriage:

In a time of fluctuating relations between the Tang Dynasty and the Tibetan Empire, Princess Jincheng’s marriage in 710 AD was a strategic move to cement the alliance. Emperor Zhongzong sent General Yang Jue to escort her to Tibet, a journey that symbolized the diplomatic efforts of the period.

Princess Jincheng‘s Life in Tibet:

Living nearly three decades in Tibet, Princess Jincheng became an integral part of the local society, holding a position of high esteem. Her role was not only as a peace broker but also as a cultural ambassador, intertwining the destinies of the Tang Dynasty and the Tibetan Empire.

The Royal Lineage and Cultural Impact:

While Princess Jincheng and Princess Wencheng were not born princesses, their marriages elevated their statuses significantly in Tibet. Historical records from Dunhuang document the arrival and eventual passing of Princess Jincheng, indicating the reverence she received, akin to that of a queen.

The Influence of Marriage Alliances:

The marriage of Princess Jincheng, following Princess Wencheng, played a pivotal role in the Tibetan and Tang empires’ histories. It served as a powerful statement of the Tang Dynasty’s influence over the region, as reflected in the military victories of Tang generals over Tibetan forces.

0505e7fc 8ee4 40fe 846e ab266ac8ebe5
0505e7fc 8ee4 40fe 846e ab266ac8ebe5

Princess Jincheng: The Tang Dynasty’s Cultural Envoy to Tibet


Princess Jincheng, also known as Li Nunu, was a key historical figure of the Tang Dynasty, renowned for her marriage to the Tibetan King Tride Tsukten. As the foster daughter of Emperor Zhongzong and the biological daughter of Prince Li Shouli, her journey followed the path taken by Princess Wencheng seventy years earlier, symbolizing a continued cultural and political alliance between Tang China and Tibet.

A Pathway to Unity:

To facilitate Princess Jincheng’s passage into Tibet, the Tibetans carved roads through mountains. By the end of 710 AD, she arrived in Lhasa, where she was received with great honour and given the title “Kedun,” signifying her status as the primary consort of the Tibetan Emperor.

Cultural Contributions:

Accompanied by a caravan bearing silks and various treasures, including books and musicians, Princess Jincheng’s arrival marked a significant impact on cultural exchange between the Tang Dynasty and Tibet, fostering a deepening of relations and cultural integration.

Diplomacy and Conflict:

The Tang military campaigns against Tibetan territories, led by generals like Tang Xiuqing and Yang Jue, were marked by both victories and strategic manoeuvres. The donation of the Nine Bends territory to Tibet by Yang Jue, under the guise of creating a bathing area for the princess, proved to be a contentious decision leading to years of conflict.

The Aftermath of the Princess’s Marriage:

The complex interplay of alliance and battle characterized the Tang-Tibet relations for over two centuries. Despite periods of strife, the Tang Dynasty saw more victories than defeats, maintaining a strong presence in the Western Regions and along the Silk Road.

The Legacy of Princess Jincheng:

Princess Jincheng’s life in Tibet is well-documented in historical records from Dunhuang, highlighting her high status and the posthumous honours she received, on par with those of the Tibetan queens. The records speak of her revered position and the lasting influence of her marriage on the political landscape of the time.

A Call for Preservation:

As history evolved, with the introduction of modern materials, the traditional role of pottery and other crafts faced a decline. However, the legacy of figures like Princess Jincheng serves as a reminder of the importance of preserving cultural heritage. The resurgence of traditional crafts speaks to a collective desire to maintain a connection with the past and honour the ecological benefits these practices offer.

Princess Jincheng’s Diplomatic Endeavors: A Chronicle of Sino-Tibetan Relations


Princess Jincheng’s story is one of diplomacy and peace in the turbulent times of the Tang Dynasty’s border conflicts with Tibet. Following her marriage to the Tibetan King in 710 AD, she became a symbol of Sino-Tibetan amity, often engaging in efforts to foster peace between the two empires.

Letters for Peace:

Amidst the intermittent warfare post-714 AD, with both Tang and Tibet experiencing victories and defeats, Princess Jincheng, in 716 AD, penned a letter of gratitude to Emperor Xuanzong of Tang. She expressed her hopes for the restoration of the nephew-uncle alliance and gifted back with a golden goblet and other precious items.

The Overtures of Alliance:

By 717 AD, Princess Jincheng reiterated her calls for peace, highlighting the Tibetan chancellor’s desire to formalize an agreement. Emperor Xuanzong heeded these requests, marking a pivotal moment in the reconciliation process.

Renewed Conflict and Subsequent Peacemaking:

Between 722 and 729 AD, the Tang Dynasty’s military forces were frequently crushed by Tibetan troops. Emperor Xuanzong sent envoys to Tibet, where the Tibetan King, moved by the princess’s pleas, agreed to a truce, acknowledging their familial bond and the prior aggressions that had led to conflict.

Cultural Exchanges and Lasting Peace:

In 730 AD, Tibetan envoys delivered gifts to Chang’an and sought literary works to take back to Tibet, demonstrating the cultural exchange fostered by Princess Jincheng. By 732 AD, she petitioned Emperor Xuanzong for the establishment of a proper residence, signifying the continued peace and happiness of the two nations.

Boundary Settlements and Trade:

The year 733 saw the finalization of borders and peace treaties between the Tang Dynasty and Tibet, with trade agreements and non-aggression pacts cemented at Gansong Ridge, illustrating the enduring impact of Princess Jincheng’s diplomacy.

Conclusion:

Princess Jincheng’s narrative is a testament to the power of intercultural marriage as a diplomatic tool during the Tang Dynasty. Her influence stretched beyond the royal courts, as she played a crucial role in shaping the political landscape of the era and ensuring lasting peace and prosperity for the people of both empires.


About the author

The Tibetan Travel website's creator, hailing from Lhasa, is a cultural enthusiast. They promote responsible tourism, connecting the world to Tibet's beauty and heritage. Awards recognize their contribution.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Proceed Booking